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appreciate your efforts no doing that. it's interesting, we're working and you have some large cities in this state but it's a very rural state as is arkansas and so many places that we represent. i mentioned the licensing and how it came up with the police. i know you are on the cutting edge of that. i think you had a summit. can you tell me a little bit about how that went and some of the sessions that you had in that area? >> i didn't understand your question. >> the credentialing, making it such that -- >> just like the veteran skills jobs act. as i said in my statement that if you're a hum vie driver in afghanistan dodging land mines then when you come home you ought to be able to be a truck driver. or if you're a medic you ought to be able to come home and not go through step one in being an e.m.t. i think you're working in the right direction and we're working in the right direction to make this better for our veterans and our service members when they come home. >> the congressman, the chairman mentioned what's on all of our minds, the backlog and stuff and how we can be helpf
their impact. >> a follow-up question -- i am not thinking of any city in particular here. with that kind of operation, let's say you have that operation in a city where the daily newspaper in town started to do some very strange things. i imagine that. it was owned by somebody who was very openly talking they were going to support particular causes, particular developments, particular parties. i imagine something like that could happen. does that add to the obligation of citizens, people like you, to do more to fill that void? or can you still fill the void -- is that city just out of luck? >> first of all, it is a remarkable symbol of what is happening to journalism. locally, the owners of the "union tribune" just purchased the "north county times" -- the assets are collapsing in value. they bought it for $12 million, sold his house for $18 million. putting aside that, these properties can be acquired and done with resume. -- as you may. this is not an expensive problem defects. i think that is an important thing to remember. i have a budget of a little more than $1 million, which is a
that a single city or state or even a region is unable to adequately address in the leadup to a disaster where there is warning or in the immediate aftermath of that, the necessary resources to assist and to recover, and so as a nation we need some mechanism to gather together all of the strength of this incredible country we call america and apply that strength to those that have been so severely harmed by that disaster. and that's occurring. fema has clearly been significantly improved in the last four years and certainly since the tragedies of new orleans, but there's much more that needs to be done, and as a country, as representatives of the american people, people who may be in any part of this country and at any moment could be affected by a disaster, we need to make sure that there is a national response capability in place ready to act with the sufficient resources. that's not just organizational, administrative issue. that's also the necessary funds available. shortchanging that money that we set aside for those disasters can lead to a period of time in which inaction is inevitable,
is a former city councilmember where he served newark as president of that council and county freeholder and takes over after the very tragic passing of his dad, don payne sr., who worked with over the years. don before me, we worked side by side on issues related to africa. the speaker: the gentleman will suspend. will the house please be in order? will the house please be in order? could members please take their seats? the gentleman may proceed. mr. smith: again, i'll be very brief. he takes over, of course, after the tragic passing of don payne who all of us loved, admired and respected. and i sat next to don for years on the foreign affairs committee. he was the chairman of africa. i chaired it and do so today, and we worked side by side on malaria and a whole host of very important issues relevant to health and well-being to the people of africa, global health and human rights. don, you have very big shoes to fill. i'm sure you'll do it, and it's a great pleasure -- don has been an activist on a number of issues, including embracing arms. he works very strongly on job creation in n
me just pick one constituent city, in corby, it went down 4.6% last month. >> for the first time in my parliamentary career, i wholeheartedly agree with him. let's just savor and treasure this moment. because i suspect it will be very, very rare, indeed. but i like it when i heard the honorable member had been sent to a jungle to eat insects, i thought despite the appearance of civility from my new chief whip this indicated a new disciplinaryian approach in our whip's office and i totally agree with him we are doing a great job together to fix the economy and great jobs for people in the future and that's a great shared endeavor. >> you've been watching prime minister's questions from the british house of commons. question time airs live on c-span 2 every wednesday at 7:00 a.m. eastern when the house of commons is in session, and again on sunday nights at 9:00 p.m. eastern and pacific on c-span. next week, members are out for a short autumn re-recess. question time returns on wednesday, november 21, 2012. watch any time at c-span.org where you can find video of past prime ministe
. it ain't a senatsecret. in utah they ran across the city government that raised taxes. tax increases are like certain social diseases. they stay with you forever. if you cannot run for congress or senate having raised taxes as a mere. i would really encouraging people to be made and politicians to also be a and not pick up and s t d, tax transmits a political error that will haunt you in the future even when you have reform and are better. >> thank you very much for being here. >> we are back with an russell berman steven sloan after talking with grover norquist. the author of the pledge that many know as the anti-tax pledge, we just heard a recipe from mr. norquist for a stalemate that is coming up. they are all putting their markers down. what are you hearing about what is going to happen over the next couple of weeks? >> it seems like there is a little bit of room on the middle on taxes. we just are talking about tax policy. the president has said he wants ealthy to pay more. john boehner has said they will not increase tax rates on anyone. they will put revenue on the table. mayb
, the cities and several united states are taking also more seriously their relationship in the latin communities. it is not something that only has to do with latinos. with a project with some audience -- with some malians and other parts of the state. the city's take this seriously. the capital is changing politically. that does not mean we are rubbed with salsa. it means that there has to be some accommodation and communication process that latino organizations were not very familiar with, but have learned in the past five years how to adapt. >> thank you, manuel. margaret? >> not to keep talking about china, i think the south american question is interesting and offers an important comparison. the u.s. is still by far the largest trade partner for the region and largest investor in the region, but you have time as the largest trade partner chile, peru and brazil. yet the pacific alliance, three of these countries are in south america, and that has emerged to a third from this perception and that america that the u.s. has failed to fully work hard enough to integrate some countries
of a lateral pipeline off the coast of new york city. it will pass under the gateway national recreation area and deliver natural gas to residents of brooklyn and queens. under current law, the national park service does not have the authority to approve the pipeline. therefore, hongman grimm introduced h.r. 2606 to allow the project to move forward benefiting not only new york residents but also visitors to gateway national recreation area. h.r. 2606 has bipartisan support and is supported by the national park service. the house approved its legislation in february. it has passed the senate with noncontroversial amendments. we are now acting to send this to the president. i urge adoption of h.r. 2606 and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from arizona virginia tech. mr. grijalva: thank you, mr. speaker. i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. grijalva: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from arizona is recognized. mr. grijalva: we ha
in kansas city they have a son in politics. but my parents, it's the hold and family has been a political inspiration, my family has been the character and social values that my mother and father have. my dad's incredible work ethic have shipped to i am and i would not be able to, i would not have been able to do anything without the support and nurturing that continues to this day and will continue for a long time. i also have -- i also have two kansas city brothers, my brother stephen my brother patrick and their wives. four of their five kids, four nieces and nephews of mine. we are a very tight, a classic irish catholic family. i admirer growth -- both of my brothers and their wives and kids. they are zero ways here when i need them. pat and steve, i love you guys. thank you for being here. let's do this -- let's thanking congratulate senator jim webb for a great job. [applause] i -- when jim decided not to run, i was conflicted. i wish i had been on the trail campaigning for his reelection. i have said this over and over again, i am not running to be his replacement because i do not
in which hundreds of bombs have -- rockets have been shot at israel. some of its largest cities as the targets. and this is a matter in which obviously much high levels in our government, there have been communications and the assurance that israel has the right to defend itself. but i think that we can see in this russia trade agreement that if we can get to the point where there can be relationships that are built on self-interest and economic development, that we can put the weapons aside and move towards a circumstance in which people are focused on economic activity. we see in this crisis a circumstance that we hope will resolve itself. obviously we stand with our ally, but we also hope for a day in which peace will reign and economic opportunities. i agree with david dreier, really is a way in which eventually we can create a circumstance in which people will not have the necessity to resort to violence. i thank the gentleman for yielding me the time. i thank the house and i hope that we will pass this bill. mr. dreier: would the gentleman yield? i express to my very dear
. help them to take their skills and build a new and meaningful life in the cities and rural communities all across our land gwe pray for our military members who are serving in harm's way in afghanistan and around the world. may they know that a grateful nation remembers an honors their service. now major presence bring healing and comfort to our nation's veterans and their families, hear our prayer for veterans. amen. >> now i would like to invite the national president of the retired enlisted association to lead us in our pledge of allegiance. >> i pledge allegiance to the flag at the united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. >> please be seated. it is now my distinct privilege to introduce the members of the veterans day national committee. the committee was formed by presidential order in 1954 to hold this annual observance in honor of america's veterans and to encourage and support veterans day observances throughout the nation. please hold your applause until i have introduced these spec
cities simultaneously, and they would show different cities and the same thing, and that was really unprecedented. i do think that momentum and communication has broken down a bit since march. egyptians are consumed with egyptian politics. two nations -- others are concerned with their own. it is not nearly as intense. it is not manifesting in quite the same way now. the other part of it is bad things spread. i saw a survey not too long ago showing there are higher numbers of egyptians that say that shia should not be considered -- most egyptians probably have not seen a shia in their lives. sectarianism is also being spread through the media channels. >> i think on the unification issue, i agree that there is diversity. libya, tunisia, focusing on local issues, but how they identify themselves is still interesting. only about one-third across the board identify with the state as their first identity. even muslim, it is really muslim-arab. when you ask them if the state should serve the interests, you say -- you have a large chunk saying -- but politically, it is fascinating. we are
city. when storms like that happen, it does help consensus. i do not think that will be at the top of the agenda. immigration reform is probably more of the momentum behind that. >> there are two issues that have changed dramatically, 180 degrees. one is gay rights. this country went to a much broader acceptance of gay rights and gay marriage. just stunning. part is a democratic shift. the other is a climate change. there was a big movement among evangelicals to save the lord's earth, to save the greatest gift we were given. it made a lot of sense with the far right's agenda. it has been turned into the exact opposite. climate change is happening and it is partially caused by human kind. that is happening just a few years after both parties in a pretty wide degree that something had to be done for different reasons. stunning. >> somebody was compiling the best tweets of the campaign. "i agree with the scientific consensus on global warming. call me crazy." that's where things were. there could be changes to the party. >> it may take the economy to get more on track before the resis
city or a saving chrysler, that was all done on a bipartisan basis. that is the way the great senate operated. host: the gulf of tonkin resolution was also on a bipartisan basis. guest: it was within a period of weeks after the civil rights act of 1964 that they did the gulf of tonkin resolution. many of them always regretted doing it. the truth is, they decided to give political cover to president johnson during the 1964 campaign. the wanted to stand by the president. they never intended, none of them, intended it to be a blank check to enlarge the vietnam war. they regretted having died and he started using it that way. from 1964 on, the senate was the focal point of the opposition to the war. democrats opposing it during president johnson's term, republicans joining them as well, president nixon's term, the second moral imperative that these centers dealt with was ending the war. host: can there be a parallel drawn between the actions of the senate in that period and the support of the gulf of tonkin resolution and the support of the congress with george w. bush and moving into th
democrats to join us and who fought his leftist opponents on the -- idea that america was a shining city upon a hill. what we got was a week moderate candidate handpicked by the beltway elite and country club establishment wing of the republican party. the presidential loss is unequivocally on them. with a catastrophic loss, the tea party is the last best hope america has to restore her founding principles. while it may take longer to restore with president, back in office we're not going away. it took nearly 100 years to take america to the place where we are today. it will take more than 3 1/2 years to restore our constitution. we're going to keep fighting. we respect the constitution and we now that for america to succeed, we need to continue educating americans on our core principles. constitution. and why our solution is essential for america's greatness. when we fight for our principles, we win. our work begins today. county by county, district by district, we will fight for freedom the way others in america have fought for freedom in the past. we turn our attention to local and st
city. west virginia, they elected a democratic governor and senator with 61%, and yet the president talked out at 36%. i just wanted to get your comments on that. >> you've got three different things than two different situations. in missouri, let's face it, todd akin contaminated it. in places like montana and west virginia, you have democrats that could have told you on january 1 -- could have told you four years ago that president obama was going to be a liability in my state, and i am not going to have to -- there never will be any lack of distance between me and him at any point. it is not like they have been cozying up to him and then -- the picture that republicans had of joe manchin and president obama together, there is only one reason they could get the picture, because they had to be at the same funeral. that is the only reason that picture even existed, because there is not a second picture of them together. so these guys had a lot of notice to create a lot of distance, and rebel to do it. >> i have other examples i could give you. in massachusetts, a pro gay marriage, p
's miami book fair international. he would discuss back to blood and it's taken the city of miami. >> my favorite program as "book tv." i also like the coverage of the book fares. occasionally they will cover lectures from different historians at universities. i thought it very informative. i like the diversity of the coverage. i learn about topics and made you would not encounter -- i may be would not encounter. and stories of the new south, that would not necessarily a pop up on search as i normally do. my husband and i sat there and watch it and learned a lot about the characteristics of a new versus old south. i also get introduced to books that maybe my friends and colleagues and not talking about. >> she watches c-span and comcast. c-span, created by america's cable company in 1979, brought to you as a public-service breyer television provider. >> president obama says the election showed the majority of americans agree with the the as a reduction plan to cut spending. the president has invited congressional leaders to the white house next week to discuss the deficit and warned abou
to reimagine his hometown in "detroit city is the place to be: the afterlife of an american met pop police" in. in "the outpost," jake tapper, white house correspondent for abc news, reports on combat outpost in afghanistan and the pentagon investigation that determined the post was unnecessary after numerous soldiers had already lost their lives. look for these titles in bookstores this coming week and watch for the authors in the near future on book tv and on booktv org. >> 2013 should be the year we begin to solve our debt through tax reform and entitlement reform. and i'm proposing it's going to be a fiscal cliff together in a manner that ensures that 2013 is finally the year that our government comes to grips with the major problems that are facing us. >> i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenges. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i'm not going to ask students and seniors and middle-class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me making over $250,000 aren't asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> t
elections. >> recent thri museum of jewish heritage in new york city hosted a conversation on the role of embedded jurne lists. they discuss their role as journalists in iraq afghanistan and columbia. this is about 50 minutes. >> thank you for the introductions. i would like to thank you in advance. we are talking about the ethics of journalists. i am not a journalist. i am a historian. what you guys call this? do you refer to being embedded as -- how do we talk about this? >> an embed means -- you could be with the military and not be embedded. i signed a contract with the military. as far as i know, this is pretty much invented by the military and all this terminology, before that, you would just say, i am reporting with the army. >> there is an indication with embedded that you are living with them and you have shelter, food, and are with them. >> you can rely on them for food and security. we only refer to embeds as far as the military. >> it is about journalists who are working during world war ii. >> journalists were given a rank. the word embedded was not called that. it fell ou
in the cities and rural communities all across our land. we pray for our military members who are serving in harm's way in afghanistan and around the world. may they know that a grateful nation remembers and honors their service. now may your presence bring healing and comfort to our nation's veterans and their families. hear our prayer for veterans, amen. >> now i'd like to invite national president of the retired association to lead us in our pledge of alegions. >> i pledge alean jens to the flag of the united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, inddwissable with liberty and justice for all. >> please be seated. it is now by distinct privilege to introduce the members of the veterans day national committee. the committee was formed in 1954 to hold in observance in honor of american's veterans tooned encourage and support veterans day observance throughout the nation. please hold your applause. if you're able please stand when i call your name. rick delaneny retired enlisted association. harold congressional medal of honor society. larry nat
income across ago looking marine purity city could go to quantico and they will get you in good shape. i had to do both boot camps and one summer. -- in one summer. i then went back and graduated in joined the marine corps. it was the most defining experience of my bike. i have all intention of staying in three years and getting out. as i got involved with the people in the leadership and the mission of the marine corps and what we're doing for the country and just the experience itself, i decided to stay. it was a great opportunity for me to serve the country. what i learned from that experience is everyone that you meet in the military and the country has something to offer. everyone has something to offer. everyone is capable of doing something. you are more capable of doing more than what you expect to can do. i always say that we always raise the bar higher. that was some of the experiences. people are extraordinary. the young marines were exceptional all through my career. >> your younger days were a bit different. i read eager up in iowa. he worked at a subway sandwich shop. >> i
in the government and corporate and nonprofit sectors, including the city government of washington tv and the national mental health association and the national alliance on mental illness where she served as a chief operating officer. she is an ordained minister and she most recently served in the community of washington. seated next to her is patricia williams, professor of law at kobe university and she writes the monthly diary of a mad law professor column. she is the author of several books, including most recently, a family friend, and the search for the rim of my own. which is a personal collection of stories and anecdotes and biographies. next to professor williams is rebecca tracer. many of you may recognize her from her many television appearances. she's the author of big girls don't cry, the election that changed everything for american women's. she writes about politics and gender and has contributed to the new york observer, "the new york times", vogue, and among many other publications. please join me in welcoming her this afternoon. [applause] thank you all for coming.
which is what they were supposed to be in the first place. not just city but the whole country who understood the united states had deep respect for their lives. and this was not the old paternalism, this was partnership, because without it, -- partnership, that is -- without that partnership, rwanda would not have managed to get life-saving aids drugs to 91% of the people who needed them. good leadership. as it happens. with problems in rwanda, other fronts, but with this, they got the aids drugs by people provided by the united states. it's a moving story. and we are moved by such moving events. i'm probably here because of such events. but i tell you this. in the one campaign ours is not a soft focal lens. with try to keep our -- cold. welcome the evidence-based activists. can you believe that? the dry necessary of that term. i'm proud of the dry necessary. -- the dryness. evidence-based activism. yours truly. and i'm here to tell you that your heart is not most important thing. it helpst. but your heart is not going to solve these problems. if your heart hasn't found a rhyme wi
to prosperity so we remain the shining city on the help. and people back to work, create a pro-growth environment. party politics got this into this mess. host: our next call for amy kremer comes from ronald in canton, ohio. caller: i want to say that the president wants to raise taxes on the rich and the businesses, not the business, the rich to pay their fair share. one thing i will say, all of this time during the campaign, all the businesses and rich folks, they spend all of this money toward the campaign for mitt romney and yet they do not want to pay their fair share. that does not make any sense. they spent all of that money and now they say we cannot do that. they just spent a billion dollars. think how much that would have helped the country to get better, but they say we do not want to do that. give me an answer on that. guest: look, the democrats spent a billion dollars, too. i think $6 billion was spent in the election. you know, i think that is two different subjects. the money that is spent in the campaigns verses people paying taxes, i do not think either one of
to join us and who fought his leftist opponents on the -- idea that america was a shining city upon a hill. what we got was a week moderate candidate handpicked by the beltway elite and country club establishment wing of the republican party. the presidential loss is unequivocally on them. with a catastrophic loss, the tea party is the last best hope america has to restore her founding principles. while it may take longer to restore with president, back in office we're not going away. it took nearly 100 years to take america to the place where we are today. it will take more than 3 1/2 years to restore our constitution. we're going to keep fighting. we respect the constitution and we now that for america to succeed, we need to continue educating americans on our core principles. on the importance of the constitution. and why our solution is essential for america's greatness. when we fight for our principles, we win. our work begins today. county by county, district by district, we will fight for freedom the way others in america have fought for freedom in the past. we turn our attention to
throughout the city, they would travel throughout the country. now the situation is that the u.s. diplomats all live in essentially what's a little green zone. so you have them staying at the sheridan hotel which is right above the embassy in sort of the secure corridor, and then going to work at the embassy and then going back to the hotel and back and forth. and when you don't get out, even into the capital city, it's very, very difficult to ascertain what's actually going on there in the country. and so i really do think that, you know, let me put it this way. there are a couple of different ways that this debate has been talked about. in the u.s. we tend to talk about drones and we tend to talk about the technology. and that i think derives a little bit from the fact that neither the bush administration or the obama administration really made an effective legal or moral or ethical framework. and this is something that i think has been a real failure of american leadership from both parties. i think when you look back into american history, whether it's in the supreme court, whether it's
to confront the threat of climate change than your opponent. tomorrow you're going up to new york city where you're going to, i assume, see people still suffering the effects of hurricane sandy which many people say is further evidence of how a warming globe is changing our weather. what specifically do you plan to do in a sec term to tackle the issue of climate change? and do you think the political will exists in washington to pass legislation that could include some kind of attacks on carbon? >> you know, as you know, mark, we can't attribute any particular weather event to climate change. what we do know is the temperature around the globe is increasing. faster than was predicted even 10 years ago. we do know that the arctic icecap is melting, faster than was predicted even five years ago. we do know there have been extraordinarily -- there have been an extraordinarily large number of severe weather events here in north america but also around the globe. and i am a firm believer that climate change is real, that it is impacting by human behavior and by carbon emissions and i think we hav
, the president will travel to the new york city area to view the storm damage, talk with citizens recovering for the storm and sank the first responders that put their lives at risk. the president will meet on friday with leaders of both sides as previously mentioned at the white house to discuss the actions -- >> that is the first meeting? that is congressional leaders? >> i have no other meeting to announce at that time. i can tell you the congressional leaders meeting will be on friday to discuss the action we need to take to keep the economy growing and reduce our deficit. thank you very much. yes, thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] guest: david petraeus said in a statement that he had shown extremely poor judgment in having the affair. president obama said that david has provided extraordinary service to the united states for decades. by any measure, he was one of the outstanding general officers of his generation. today, i accepted his resignation as director of the federal intelligence agency. i a
international. he'll discuss his latest novel and its take on the city of miami plus questions from the miami audience. later tonight on afterwards in the fine plant a look at the way corporations try to rob you blind on c-span2. >> "washington journal" continues. >> we want to welcome the former lieutenant governor of maryland michael steele welcome back to c-span. what happened tuesday guest: i think from the democrats perspective they got an affirmation of the policies and the direction that the president arctic cue lated. as a i would say there wasn't much art lation there but they showed they are spoir in getting their vote to the table and with the pick up in the senate i think a lot of people kind of looked at the senate as one of those fire walls that the republicans needed to pick up two seats was a profound effort as well. and it really makes the policy discussion take on a very different hugh than it otherwise would. and i think for the republicans it was one of those come to jesus 340e789s politically where they have to reassess and evaluate whether they want to be a relevant poli
a bird counts, maternal clinics. not just in the city but the whole country. they understood the united states have deep respect for their lives. this is not the old paternalism. this was partnership. without partnership rwanda would not have managed to get life- saving drugs to 91% of the people who needed them. good leadership. there are problems in rwanda with the leadership. on this comment they got the strokes provided by the united states. it is a blooming story. we are moved by such moving events. i am probably here because such events. ours is not a soft oakland's. we try to keep our of - -lens. we try to keep our honor code. can you believe the dryness of the term, evident based, excellence. yours truly. i am here to tell you that your heart is not the most important thing. your heart is not going to solve these problems. if your car does not find the right in your head we're not going to get away. it is not charity that fires us. it is justice. that is what inflames us. justice is a higher standards. people are looking for clean and simple melody lines. just a dollar and you c
video from the national book awards in new york city and red carpet interviews with finalists. all online, live tomorrow at 6:00 p.m. eastern. add your comments on facebook.com/booktv. >> secretary geithner spent tuesday at the annual wall street journal ceo council meeting. this is a half hour. >> ladies and gentlemen, the treasury secretary of the united states, tim geithner. [applause] the people in this room, we polled them before you got there, by two to one we do not expect a deal before we hit the fiscal cliff. there is a bit of a highlighting of the dominican republic, which we have not figured out. [laughter] i think there is a lot of anxiety in this room about the fiscal cliff. do you think we will go over it, or are you confident they will deal with the other side before we get there? >> there is a lot to sea, but i think there is every reason to believe this is a solvable problem. it is true we have a lot of challenges with the country. but there is a lot of support for trying to do things that will help make the economy stronger in the short term. universal support for
" and it's take on the city of miami. sunday at 6:00 eastern on "book tv" on c-span 2. removed fromays election day, fred barnes joins us for a look back at campaign 2012 and the future of the republican party. thank you for being here. what went wrong for mitt romney? why did he lose a race that so many thought coming into the election was his to win? guest: including me. this was more of a race i have to say that obama won by having such a strong campaign rather than romney losing. obama may have been the only democratic candidate running on a record of a weak economy and debt crisis that we face and still win. yet, he did. they did very many things that were right. you can point to a couple of things with mitt romney. he may not have been the perfect candidate for 2012 given his corporate turnaround background, secondly, he did not get something republicans have counted on and that is the white working-class voters. in states like ohio, the ads attacking mayor romney as a corporate raider and buccaneer that went on for many months put on by the obama campaign seemed to work. the whi
on the city of miami. >> "washington journal" continues. host: "los angeles times" bureau thanks ford lauter. coming in. the headline on the peace in "the l.a. times," is, no longer your father's electorate. guest: by a large margin, this was the most diverse racially, ethnically, and any we have had in the past american elections. this is no longer a monolithic white country. it was for a while, but now the electorate is rapidly catching up with the changing demographic realities of the country. host: as much has been made about the declining white vote, the white vote made up about 72% of this year's electorate. would that be the deciding factor in this election? guest: it probably was the biggest single factor. there were other factors of went into the election. that was the predominant one. the decline of the white vote to about 72% does not sound like a lot a percentage points, but that is the millions of people. the republicans had hoped but the white share of the electorate this year would be higher than it was in 2008. they calculated of the white share ticked up boards, mitt romney
will be announced when they are available. >> new york city or new york area? >> new york area. >> earlier today the president queened a call with homeland security, fema chief of staff and other senior members of his team. on the call the president received an update on the latest response and recovery efforts in the affected area. he also heard from fema administrator on the latest efforts to meet the continuing power and fuel challenges facing affected communities as well as ongoing work of the governors and their teams for housing solutions for the families. administrator is in new york survey i have aing damage and ongoing response recovery efforts t. president directed his team to bring all available resources to bear to support our state and local partners and not allow red tape to stand in the way of federal support that can be provided t. president will continue to receive updates on the response and recovery efforts from his team. and with that i'll take your questions. >> thanks and welcome to the lame duck session. we just heard the president say two things, one is that he's not [ina
reagan's rhetoric. in his farewell address, he talked about the shining city on the hill. if you had to have walls, the the walls have gates. you have not heard a lot of rhetoric like that from republicans. that is ronald reagan. that is the guy that builds the majority. if we can get back to the regan mentalitythat we welcome all regardless of what you look like, who share our values. we will get back and we will get back quickly. bush got 44% of the latino vote because he tried. we are not that far away from being of the level of being competitive with the right leaders. we have to have the right leaders. >> and in terms of the immediate issue of immigration reform, they blanked on it for fear of legislators from heavily blue-collar distress and hedging economic advance -- blue-collar leaders and hedging economic events. they have to be able to deliver tangible uplift and improvement for this coalition in order to hold it together. >> it needs to deliver for america. it is a function of the number one issue of the election, which is the economy. howe we are going to grow it and wha
the opponents on the idea that america was a shining city upon a hill. what we got was a week, moderate candidate handpicked by the beltway elites. the president to loss is unequivocally on them. with a catastrophic loss of the republican elites, handpicked candidates, the tea party at the last, best hope america has to restore her from the principles. while the bay take longer to restore these principles with president obama back in office, we are not going away. instead of the 100 years to take america to the place where we are today. it will take more than three and a half years to restore our constitution. we are going to keep fighting. we respect the constitution and we know for america to succeed, we need to continue educating americans on our core principles. on the importance of the constitution and why our solutions are essential for america's continued greatness. we fight for our principles, we win. our work again today. county by county, state by state, district by district, will fight for freedom the way others in america have fought for freedom in the past. we turn our atte
% and obama tops out at 44%, and lost every county except jefferson st. louis and st. louis city. west virginia, they elected a democratic governor and senator with 61%, and yet the president talked out at 36%. i just wanted to get your comments on that. >> you've got three different things than two different situations. it, -- in let's face missouri, todd akin contaminated it. in places like montana and west virginia, you have democrats that could have told you on january 1 -- could have told you four years ago that president obama was going to be a liability in my state, and i am not going to have to -- there never will be any lack of distance between me and him at any point. it is not like they have been cozying up to him and then -- the picture that republicans had of joe manchin and president obama together, there is only one reason they could get the picture, because they had to be at the same funeral. that is the only reason that picture even existed, because there is not a second picture of them together. so these guys had a lot of notice to create a lot of distance, and rebel
on a bill the plan and the australian city today as part of the annual security meeting. attended by hillary clinton and leon panetta. they held as as a major leap forward in bilateral cooperation. and an import a new frontier in that state's rebounds to the asia-pacific area. and an update on the david petearus situation. leading investigators to a questionable relationship between the tampa florida socialite and the general commander of the war in afghanistan. their main question was a national security threatened? the extramarital affair was between the general petraus and paula broadwell. is a sense harassing e-mails to a woman -- who they say send harassing e-mails to a woman, jill kelley. jill kelley treated thousands of applications messages with the general john allen. possible evidence of another inappropriate relationship. defense secretary leon panetta speaking earlier today and australia says he has continued confidence in a general john allen to remain as commander of united states forces in afghanistan, despite his connection to the scandal. we will hear more on the scandal lat
the president largely on that issue. the freak storm ravaged new york city. when storms like that happen, it does help consensus. i do not think that will be at the top of the agenda. immigration reform is probably more of the momentum behind that. >> there are two issues that have changed dramatically, 180 degrees. one is gay rights. this country went to a much broader acceptance of gay rights and gay marriage. just stunning. part is a democratic shift. the rise of the young voters who are more tolerant. the other is a climate change. there was a big movement among evangelicals to save the lord's earth, to save the greatest gift we were given. it made a lot of sense with the far right's agenda. it has been turned into the exact opposite. climate change is happening and it is partially caused by human kind. that is happening just a few years after both parties in a pretty wide degree that something had to be done for different reasons. stunning. >> somebody was compiling the best tweets of the campaign. john hunstman in the primaries. "i agree with the scientific consensus on global warm
news being made in the cities this morning. but anyway. thank you all for being here again. i'm just going to quickly introduce our panel. you have all been introduced to stephanie shriak but i want to make a couple of points. one is i think debby made so eloquently and claire, emily's list, record year of fundraising and electing women democrats. before she was president of emily's list, stephanie was quite possibly the best democratic campaign manager in the country. she ran john hoefter's first senate campaign and al franken's campaign and his contested -- whatever that was. so she clearly brought that experience tomely's list and helped elect a lot of women. next to stephanie is anne who is a partner at an award winning media consultant with 20 years of experience consulting on and managing top-level campaigns. her client this year, she had two jobs. she ran women's volt for emily's list and did battleground state media for the obama campaign. so we'll hear more from her not only about how we turned out women for emily's list candidates but the president's priorities. next to her
constitution. host: let's hear from johnson city, tennessee. hi, devin. caller: good morning. thank you for serving this country. where do you think this country will be in about 10 years? do you plan on running in 2016? if you do, will you run with jesse ventura? guest: i don't have any plans in 2016. you want to know where i think the country will be in 10 years, as a matter of fact, i'm pretty optimistic that things might be a lot better, but the problem is we have to go through the wringer first. where i'm very encouraged, you know, i deal with ideas and changing people's attitudes about the role of government and self-reliance and responsibility. but where i have been encouraged, whether the 2008 campaign or the 2012 campaign, that the reception kept growing and growing on the universities. in all true -- and all true philosophic have to start with the young people. the receptions have been fantastic. and they're interested in free markets. they're interested in this. the young people graduating from college are aware. what do they have? personal debt that they can't pay. the jobs
is the head of the economics department at the university of missouri kansas city. bruce bartlett is someone i have known for ever. have known forever. he is now one of the foremost authorities, and has been for some time, on tax policy, tax reform. you can see his writing in "the new york times." he has a great economic blog. he would be shooting me if i did not mention the book. he has several. the latest is "the benefits and the burden." it is a history and review of tax reform issues. i get my tongue% now, right? and then we have the chief economist of the center for budget and policy priorities, which is where budget analysts go to talk to budget analysts. stephanie, i am going to start with you. there is a basic question. did you see the look of shock on her face? the basic question to start with. jamie said we should not panic, but you cannot turn on cnbc or bloomberg and not talk to people about to panic, if they are not already. is there a reason we should be concerned about the fiscal cliff beck's is the damage that great that this is something that has to be prevented under any circ
look at the city, one of those four walls that the republicans needed to pick up two seats was a profound effort as well. it kind of makes the policy discussion take on a very different hue. for the republicans it was one of those come dejesus moments politically were the have to reassess and reevaluate whether they want to be a relevant political party. host: how do they do that? guest: two years we were able to prove that you can win coming off the ash heaps of 2006 and 2008. the brand is in the tank, people are not joining the party. we were able to pull around a turnaround. by empowering the state parties to build a grass-roots operation on the ground and what i did was modeled my chairmanship at least likely how we operated after how we deemed it down with a 50 state strategy, putting emphasis on states where republicans have not to believe one in the past to go in there and not try to win it all but to win some. when a county council race, when the mayor's race, when the legislative race and the bill -- build that from the bottom up, have a message that resonated and
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